Did you know that Greenlaw………….?

Hume Castle

Posted: December 10th, 2020

Greenlaw is located in the foothills of the Lammermuir Hills on the Blackadder Water, offering visitors an idyllic, rural retreat in the heart of Berwickshire. But Greenlaw also has a colourful history and some fascinating claims to fame that you may or may not know about.

Did you know?
Greenlaw was built in the late 17th century and functioned as the county town of Berwickshire from 1569. It shared this title with Duns from 1696 until the early years of the 20th century, when Duns took it over.

Did you know?
Greenlaw’s impressive town hall, completed in 1831, is a listed building from its county town era and was one of the buildings shortlisted in the 2006 BBC television series Restoration Village. Though it did not win in its particular category, the interest created led to the gift of private money and the building was restored in 2010.

Did you know?
The remains of Hume Castle can be found 3 miles to the south of the village. Originally built in the 13th century, the castle was destroyed by Cromwell’s invading army in 1651. In 1770 the 3rd Lord Marchmont, a member of the Home Family, bought the site and built the walls you see today.

Did you know?
The last public hanging in Scotland took place in this village at the Greenlaw Kirk in 1834.

Did you know?
Places of historical interest in the village include the village kirk, built in 1657, and the Mercat Cross built in 1696 are the oldest structures in the town.

Did you know?
Greenlaw was previously situated about 1 mile south of the present village, atop a hill – the ‘Green Law’. This area is now known as Old Greenlaw.

Did you know?
Greenlaw Golf Club first appeared in the mid-1920s but it disappeared in the 1950s.

Did you know?
The county council of Berwickshire was formed in 1890 and applied for a grant of arms the same year. The coat of arms shows a bear chained to a wych elm tree, a pun on the county’s name: bear + wych = Berwick. The coat of arms is featured on the Berwickshire High School badge.

Did you know?
Blackadder Water forms part of the River Tweed system. The name Blackadder is derived from the Old English awedur which means “running water” or “stream”.

 

Photocredit – VisitScotland